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Archive for the ‘Motivational Break’ Category

King had a boulder placed on a roadway. Then he hid himself and watched to see if anyone would remove the huge rock. Some of the king’s wealthiest merchants and courtiers came by and simply walked around it. Many loudly blamed the King for not keeping the roads clear, but none did anything about getting the stone out of the way.

Then a peasant came along carrying a load of vegetables. Upon approaching the boulder, the peasant laid down his burden and tried to move the stone to the side of the road. After much pushing and straining, he finally succeeded. After the peasant picked up his load of vegetables, he noticed a purse lying in the road where the boulder had been. The purse contained many gold coins and a note from the King indicating that the gold was for the person who removed the boulder from the roadway.

The peasant learned what many of us never understand! Every obstacle presents an opportunity to improve our condition.

Its only you who can remove the obstacles from your path if you want to succeed in life.

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COMPETE, DON’T COMPARE
The greatest freestyle swimmer of all time, Janet Evans, owns 45 National Titles, four gold medals and three world records. Just before the race for Olympic qualification on the Atlanta Team her coach, Mark Schubert, pulled her aside. Coach Schubert said to her, “Don’t forget who you are.”

At the U.S. Olympic Trials, Evans was surrounded by younger and perhaps hungrier swimmers. One said she thought the 24-year-old Evans was scared of the other competition. So as Evans walked to the starting blocks for the 400-meter freestyle, her coach took just a moment to remind his swimmer of her credentials. Don’t forget who you are – compete, but don’t compare!

Janet Evans went out and made her third Olympic team, winning the 400-meter freestyle in splendid fashion. Janet Evans, with Coach Schubert’s help, learned that winning means excelling at being you.

The former Cleveland Browns’ All-Pro, Bill Glass, often says to his audiences, “Be yourself, but learn to be your best self. Don’t use being yourself as an excuse for laziness or mediocrity. Be what you ought to be. Stretch toward what you are created to be and in the stretching, you’re certain to become a better and more effective person.”

Each of us measures success differently. However, we can all agree that success today isn’t measured by what we are. It’s measured by what we are, compared to what we could be. In other words, measure your individual success in selling by comparing it to your real potential – your best self.

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“If you can dream it, you can do it.” – Walt Disney

“If you always do what you always did, you will always get what you always got.” (Abraham Lincoln)

Life is short; break the rules, forgive quickly, kiss slowly, love truly, laugh uncontrollably, and never regret anything that made you smile! (Unbekannt)

“Start with the necessary, then the possible and suddenly you’re going to do the impossible.” -Franz von Assisi

Always remember that there is only one all-important time, namely: immediately! -Leo N. Tolstoy

 

 

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By three methods we may learn wisdom:
First, by reflection, which is noblest;
Second, by imitation, which is easiest;
and third by experience, which is the bitterest.

Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.

Do not impose on others what you yourself do not desire.
Everything has beauty, but not everyone sees it.

Faced with what is right, to leave it undone shows a lack of courage.

He who learns but does not think, is lost! He who thinks but does not learn is in great danger.

I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.

If I am walking with two other men, each of them will serve as my teacher. I will pick out the good points of the one and imitate them, and the bad points of the other and correct them in myself.

It does not matter how slowly you go as long as you do not stop.

It is easy to hate and it is difficult to love. This is how the whole scheme of things works. All good things are difficult to achieve; and bad things are very easy to get.

It is more shameful to distrust our friends than to be deceived by them.

Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.

Look at the means which a man employs, consider his motives, observe his pleasures. A man simply cannot conceal himself!

Never contract friendship with a man that is not better than thyself.
Never give a sword to a man who can’t dance.

Only the wisest and stupidest of men never change.

Confucius
(born around 551 B.C.) was a Chinese thinker and philosopher.

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A merchant sent his son to learn the Secret of Happiness from the wisest of men. The young man wandered through the desert for forty days until he reached a beautiful castle at the top of a mountain. There lived the sage that the young man was looking for.

However, instead of finding a holy man, our hero entered a room and saw a great deal of activity; merchants coming and going, people chatting in the corners, a small orchestra playing sweet melodies, and there was a table laden with the most delectable dishes of that part of the world.

The wise man talked to everybody, and the young man had to wait for two hours until it was time for his audience.

With considerable patience, the Sage listened attentively to the reason for the boy’s visit, but told him that at that moment he did not have the time to explain to him the Secret of Happiness.

He suggested that the young man take a stroll around his palace and come back in two hours’ time.

“However, I want to ask you a favor,” he added, handling the boy a teaspoon, in which he poured two drops of oil. “While you walk, carry this spoon and don’t let the oil spill.”

The young man began to climb up and down the palace staircases, always keeping his eyes fixed on the spoon. At the end of two hours he returned to the presence of the wise man.

“So,” asked the sage, “did you see the Persian tapestries hanging in my dining room? Did you see the garden that the Master of Gardeners took ten years to create? Did you notice the beautiful parchments in my library?”

Embarrassed, the young man confessed that he had seen nothing. His only concern was not to spill the drops of oil that the wise man had entrusted to him.

“So, go back and see the wonders of my world,” said the wise man. “You can’t trust a man if you don’t know his house.”

Now more at ease, the young man took the spoon and strolled again through the palace, this time paying attention to all the works of art that hung from the ceiling and walls. He saw the gardens, the mountains all around the palace, the delicacy of the flowers, the taste with which each work of art was placed in its niche. Returning to the sage, he reported in detail all that he had seen.

“But where are the two drops of oil that I entrusted to you?” asked the sage.

Looking down at the spoon, the young man realized that he had spilled the oil.

“Well, that is the only advice I have to give you,” said the sage of sages. “The Secret of Happiness lies in looking at all the wonders of the world and never forgetting the two drops of oil in the spoon.”

from the book “The Alchemist”

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There was once a well-known scholar, who lived in a mountain in the Himalayas. Tired of living with men, he had chosen a simple life and spent most of his time meditating.

His fame, however, was so great that people were willing to walk narrow paths, climb steep hills, swim rivers – to meet the holy man who was believed to be able to resolve any trouble of the human heart.

The wise man said nothing but asked them to sit and wait. Three days passed, and more people arrived. When there was no room for anyone else, he addressed the people who were outside his door.

“Today I will give the answer that everyone wants. But you must promise that, to have your problems solved, you will not tell the new pilgrims that I moved here – so that you can continue to live in the solitude you so much crave. Tell me your problems” .

Someone began to speak, but was soon interrupted by others, as everyone knew that this was the last public hearing that the holy man was giving. The wise man let the situation be prolonged a little, until he cried, “Silence! Write your problems down and put the papers in front of me,” he said.

When everyone finished, the wise man mixed all the papers in a basket, then said, “Keep this basket moving amongst you. Each of you will take a paper, and read it. You will then choose whether to keep your problems, or take the one given to you.”

Each person took a sheet of paper, read it, and was horrified. They concluded that what they had written, however bad it was, was not as serious as what ailed his neighbor. Two hours later, they exchanged papers amongst themselves, and each one had to put their personal problems back into his or her pocket, relieved that their distress was not as hard as they once thought.

Grateful for the lesson, they went down the mountain with the certainty that they were happier than all the others, and – fulfilling the promise made – never let anyone disturb the peace of the holy man.

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